Spatial Analysis of the Cerro El Amay Region


Cerro El Amay is a patch of tropical montane cloud forest (TMCF) surrounded by an ocean of deforested agricultural fields.  The loss of the surrounding forest isolates El Amay from similar habitats and places its integrity in danger.  El Amay suffers the additional problem of ongoing forest loss which is caused by poor farmers cutting down the ancient trees to grow corn and bean.  This reliance on corn and beans as a way of life locks these poor people into an undending trajectory of poverty.  Meanwhile the ecological services, things like the capture of rainfall and flood protection, provided by the cloud forest, are degraded.

As a first step in addressing these and related problems, we are proposing several research projects, including an assessment of the carbon biomass contained in El Amay's forest and additional wildlife surveys.

These projects will require us to build a large database of spatial data. We have started this process with country-wide vector (point, line, and polygons) data and we currently have data representing many themes, including the following:

Protected Areas Highways Forest Cover
Populated Areas Elevation Contours Political Departments
Climate Zones Rivers and Lakes Archaeological Sites
Land Use Life Zones Population Density


We are building a database of social infrastructure including themes such as:

Schools Malnutrition Commodity Production
Airports Poverty Births and Deaths

We are also assembling a set of satellite imagery that can be used for characterizing the landscape and base mapping.

These data will help us as we pursue upcoming projects. We are very grateful to Esri for ArcGIS software support.  Please contact us if you have any questions related to this project.


      

Clear cuts in the cloud forest


The ancient cloud forest is destroyed as the village of San Pablo Cenzontle expands.


Click here, and help us save the cloud forest












Conservation Imaging, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization

updated 01/2013